Cannabis Use

Concentrates 101: Cannabis Concentrates Guide

Budder, shatter, wax, and resin—an unfamiliar person could get quite confused with cannabis concentrates. These high-potency cannabis products are rapidly becoming a preferred way to use cannabis because a “little” can go a long way. What are cannabis concentrates anyway? Are they safe? How do you use weed concentrates? Here’s a quick guide to get you started.

What are cannabis concentrates?

Cannabis concentrates are extracted, condensed parts of the cannabis plant that contain the highest concentrations of THC. Most concentrates make use of extracted oils from cannabis, which are rich in terpenes and cannabinoids (the two largest factors in giving each strain its unique set of aromas, tastes and effects). These concentrated forms of cannabis come about via a plethora of extraction processes and manipulation techniques, so you end up with a full collection of consistencies, appearances, and qualities.

Are cannabis concentrates safe?

When used responsibly and sourced from a reputable dispensary, THC concentrates are safe. The extreme potency means you can use very little to experience intense effects, so you should still be if you’re new to the world of weed. If you’re trying concentrates for the first time, it never hurts to get a little guidance from an experienced concentrate user. Some concentrates are extremely potent—as much as 90 percent THC. You may literally only need to use a dose the size of the head of a pin or the size of a grain of rice.

Types of Cannabis Concentrates

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Wax

Wax is, just as you would expect, waxy. The consistency is dense, and sometimes a bit granular, and the color is typically golden and opaque. Wax may be added to flower for twaxing (wax and cannabis mixed), but it is most often smoked using a dab rig.

Live Resin and Live Rosin

Live resin falls on the consistency scale between sauce and wax. Live resin is sticky and potent. It’s chock-full of natural cannabis terpenes because it is harvested after freezing the cannabis plant – using a solvent to extract the good stuff. Hence, the term “live.” Resins are ideal for vaping with a dab pen, but can also be used on a general dabbing setup with an e-rig or standard dab rig. What’s resin vs rosin? Both have similar consistencies, usage methods, and profiles, but rosin is created without solvents.

Shatter

Shatter is a BHO concentrate and gets its name from the fact that it looks a lot like glass. The concentrate is like thin hard candy, and it has this telltale amber color when it is high quality.

Budder, Badder, and Batter

Budder, badder, and batter are all essentially the same type of concentrate, and all are extremely potent, but there can be small differences between them. Budder has this smooth, whipped consistency that’s a lot like… well, butter. Budder is known for its high potency, but may not always have a lot of aromatics due to extra heating used beyond the extraction point. Batter and badder are sometimes a bit less smooth; some can be more saucy and loose and some can even have a bumpier consistency.

Hash and Bubble Hash

Hash is created by pressing and manipulating the buds of cannabis to harvest the sticky trichomes. What you end up with is something with the consistency of pressed, sticky powder. Bubble hash, on the other hand, is created by using ice water to pull the sticky trichomes from the plant. The end result is a loose bunch of bubbly trichomes that resembles brown sugar. Both types of hash are usually smoked or vaped using a dab rig.

Distillate

Distillate is thick like honey, and is actually resin or rosin taken a step further for a more refined product. You may also see distillate referred to as THC oil. Distillate is highly potent; you may only need a fraction of a drop to get high with a quality product. Most distillates are used along with an e-rig or dab nail, but they can also be used in vape pens or added to a cartridge.

Sauce

Also known as terp sauce, THC sauce or even “diamonds,” sauce is a sticky, syrup-like cannabis extract created by combining each strain’s specific terpenes with its cannabinoids (THCA, in particular). Sauce can also contain crystalline structures (THCa) depending on the cannabinoid profile and extraction stage, earning its previously stated nickname, Diamonds.

Crumble and Sugar

Crumble looks a lot like tiny clumps of sugar, but it is pretty dry and easy to handle. In fact, crumble is perhaps the driest form of cannabis concentrate you can find, which makes it ideal for sprinkling on a rolled joint. Crumble can also be vaporized on a rig or dab setup as well. Cannabis sugar is similar to crumble, but is slightly wet, which means it is best used with a vaporizer.

Tinctures

Tinctures are created by mixed concentrated cannabis extracts and carrier solutions. Not to be confused with pure distillate or THC oil, tinctures tend to be less potent, but just as valuable and can be ingested or used sublingually.

How to Store Cannabis Concentrates

Cannabis concentrates can be highly sensitive to temperature changes and even exposure to sunlight or oxygen. Therefore, pretty much every concentrate you find should be kept in a cool or temperature-controlled environment, out of direct sunlight, and in an airtight container.

Looking for a good collection of cannabis concentrates? Be sure to check out our menus at Silver Therapeutics, where you will find a diverse list of some of the best weed concentrates available.

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